June 23, 2016

It's Fairy Tale Feast Time Again


Food and fairy tales are as closely linked as witches and cauldrons. Not only do meals and specific foods crop in classic stories with astonishing regularity, but, to be honest and disgusting, eating people (sometimes by witches who may well have boiling cauldrons) is a common theme in some of our best food-related fairy tales.

Just think of the scrumptious house of sugar and pastry in "Hansel and Gretel"--and the witch waiting to eat them who abides there. And, of course, we have "Rapunzel," a tale that turns on a pregnant mother's burning hunger for salad (or maybe rampion).

One of the happier uses of food in fairy tales is in"Beauty and the Beast," in which much of the wooing of Beauty happens during some very lavish and civilized dinners she shares with Beast.

Today, I'm inviting visitors to tell us what they would want for a fairy tale feast. What would you drink? Eat? What would be for dessert?

I've done this before with great results, so comment below and let us know what a magical feast would consist of if you were starring in your own fairy tale. 

Image is a vintage book cover of "Beauty and the Beast."

28 comments

  1. Macaroons. The exotic crunch of coconut blended with caramel and chocolate are a perfect magical delight.

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    1. I wonder why it listed me as "unknown"... perhaps I'm shrouded in mystery. We'll go with that.

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    2. The workings of my platform are certainly shrouded in mystery.

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  2. Roast leg of lamb for the entree in honor of sleeping beauty because counting sheep puts you to sleep. Mermaid Salad for the Little Mermaid and Apple Pie for dessert for Snow White, of course.

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    1. Apple pie! Now that's good eating!

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    2. "Snow White" is most popular as a German fairy tale. So, wouldn't an apple kuchen make more sense.

      Anyway, I actually have a recipe for something called Cinderella Stew, and it's not bad. Also, may I suggest a salad made of Italian parsley for "Petrosinella" and her many variants (including "Rapunzel"). I'd suggest Rampion, but it's a little hard to get where I am.

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    3. Cinderella stew?! To the Google machine with me!

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    4. I think in the Disney version Snow White made a gooseberry pie for the 7 dwarfs.

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    5. Never had gooseberry pie. Is it good?

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    6. I've never had it either but the internet says it is similar to apples, grapes or strawberries depending on where it's grown. hmmm.

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    7. Well those are all delicious!

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    8. Gooseberries are related to currants, I think. But they are even more tart. Really, really tart. The first time I bought some at a farmer's market, the farmer said to me, "Make a pie." "Oh, I'll look and see if I can find a recipe for something to do with them," I said. He looked at me sternly. "Make a pie." I made a pie. Maybe that's all they're good for. The pie was good. :)

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  3. Water that turns in your mouth into whatever you desire (with 0 calories of course!)

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    1. That is an all around great superpower!

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  4. I love food-related fairy tales! There's a great Norwegian film, Three Hazelnuts for Cinderella. Not sure if the hazelnuts are linked to a traditional fairy tale (does anyone know?), but they definitely have a magical quality. I'm thinking....twig tea and hazelnut scones with blackberry jam & wildflower honey. Or cornish hens and hazelnut soup. Not linked to any fairy tale in particular, but parsnips feel very fairy tale to me. Maybe honey cake for Goldy Locks and the Three Bears.

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    1. Seems like parsnips have a fairy tale, but probably obscure. Mmm. Blackberry jam.

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  5. Stewed trout, meadow cream, and strawberry fizz for me. With honeyed walnuts for the finish. :)

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  6. Fairy tales make me think of peasant food, so I'll go with Allerleirauh's bread soup, and the brave little tailor's cheese which he squeezed milk from in his contest with the giant. And to finish, the cake Little Red was taking to her Granny along with some tea, because everything is better with tea!

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  7. A never-ending fountain of champagne, but you only get a little drunk, not too drunk, not matter how much you drink. I love the bubbly, but I'm such a lightweight!

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  8. Norway is not known for its cuisine, but they do have some great cakes which are worth checking out. Certainly ‘Kransekakestenger’ would suit any fairy OR witches party. With an unappetizing name (literally translated as ‘wreath cake sticks’), and a look reminds one of chopped-off fingers, first impressions are not promising. However, the chewy texture and taste of sweet almonds is simply divine, especially when dipped in chocolate. Go on, you know you want to….

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  9. What a great idea! So many thoughts spring to mind being a foodie and fairy lover: candied violets and pansies, baby corn for being so tiny, frosted sparkling gingerbread houses, marzipan because of the Christmas tradition. I was introduced to marzipan (the delicious almond paste candies shaped and colored to resemble fruit) by a German caregiver when I was little. She added the thrill of hiding them around the house for me to find. Also, my mom used to make what she called "Angel Pudding":she'd make my favorite chocolate pudding and serve it to me in a very fine crystal goblet when I was very young. She'd put a "prize" at the bottom--either a spoonful of jam or a candy or something else I liked. I could probably go on and on! LOL! It was fun thinking about it.

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    1. Wow! Your mom sounds pretty amazing. Also, I love marzipan fruits.

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  10. Thanks, my mom was indeed amazing! I have to add strawberries to the list with their heart shape, candy fragrance and dainty white flowers and of course mushrooms!

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